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About This Journal

The Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice (founded in 1978 and publishing its first thirty-one volumes as the Third World Law Journal) is a unique periodical that fills the need for a progressive, alternative legal perspective on issues both within the United States and in the developing world. The Journal's scope includes issues affecting underrepresented populations, human and civil rights, immigration, women's and children's issues, and issues of disproportionate economic impact. Published twice annually, the Journal contains both articles by outside authors and student notes and comments. The founders of the Journal envisioned it as a forum for discussing legal issues affecting people, cultures, and institutions that share a common history of colonialism, oppression, under-representation, and marginalization in the political and economic processes. Today, the Journal’s scope recognizes that issues of disproportionate economic impact implicate a complex matrix of social, economic, and political crises confronting minority groups in both the developed and developing worlds.

The Journal's 30-member staff (15 second- and 15 third-year students) comprises individuals with diverse backgrounds and interests. It is a group dedicated to offering insightful treatment of contemporary legal issues that are frequently overlooked by other legal publications. Past topics have included political asylum for Mexican police persecuted by drug cartels, forced administration of psychotropic medication to foster children, the International Criminal Court’s prosecution of those responsible for the Darfur Conflict, and interstate recognition of same-sex unions.